IMG_5542.JPG

Hi.

Welcome to my blog. I love building blanket forts and finding other ways to celebrate ordinary moments of life.  

The Art of the Rotation

The Art of the Rotation

As a mom of triplets, I learned to practice the art of the rotation very early on.  I would feed one tiny baby, lay him/her down and rotate to the next one.  Often keeping the others close, likely on each side of my legs.  I never propped their bottles and fed them all at once because I treasured the time with each one individually-holding each close to my heart.  For those moments, and at the start it was nearly 45 moments {preemies are very slow eaters}, it was just the two of us.

Time moved on and before I knew it I had active toddlers.  Since they had been together from the start, they shared toys pretty well.  I realized one afternoon that they were actually always sharing.  Aside from their own bed, and special blanket, most everything else was communal property.  That day, I spread out he bug quilts that were lovingly made for them by a family friend, and on each one I placed a special toy or book and one child. This was their own space with their own toy.  After the time was up and they grew bored, I rotated each child to another blanket, with another toy-all to themselves.  Often I sat on a blanket as well, and I treasured the time with each one individually.  For those moments, often only about 10 {toddler attention spans are not very long}, it was just the two of us. 

Time moved on, and before I new it I had kindergarteners.  These were the days of half day kindergarten, and they would come home on the bus a little after noon each day.  I was too nervous to allow them to ride the bus to school with all of those big elementary school kids, but home it was just the kindergarteners, so that felt better.  Because they were all three in the same class, often they all wanted to tell them same stories-at the same time.  Part way through the year I started book time with each kiddo.  Right after lunch, I would take one child and a book of their choice and we would snuggle up on the sofa.  I would read the book, or we would read the book together, and they could tell me about their day. I treasured the time with each one individually.  For those moments, often 15-20 {they had a lot to say}, it was just the two of us. 

Time moved on, and before I knew it I had elementary school students.  Full school days and evenings of homework filled our weeks.  Often as the evening would wind down, we would gather in the family room for a short TV show.  We would snuggle up on the sofa under blankets, regardless of the season.  At the start of the show we would calculate the length, and divide it by 3, thus allowing each kiddo time to snuggle alone with me (and their dad, and truth be told-the dog).  When the time was up, someone would yell, “rotate” and everyone would move to the next spot, and I treasured the time with each one individually.  For those moments, often about 10 {the average Disney Channel or Food Network Show is about 30 minutes}, it was just the two of us. 

Time moved on, and before I knew it I have middle school students.  Even more full days that include sports, practicing instruments, and baking with evenings of homework fill our weeks.  Just a couple of evenings ago, I found myself reading next to one of my girls in the upstairs study.  Both under blankets, the the dog in the middle we sat with our feet touching.  Once she finished her reading, I moved downstairs to our barn table with my other girl who was just starting a drawing.  I sat directly across from her and opened my water color paints.  Both doing art, we sat with our feet touching.  After we finished, I moved to the couch where my son was watching the Tiger’s game.  We sat, with the dog in the middle, curled up with our feet touching.  I treasured the time with each one individually.  For those moments {about 30, it was nearing my bedtime after all}, it was just the two of us. 

As a mom of triplets, I learned the art of the rotation very early on.  And, to this day, we still practice this art.  While I no longer rotate them through feedings or place them on a blanket, we still rotate through reading together time, we still rotate when we watch a show or movie as a family {not in a theater…that might be disruptive}, and sometimes, I rotate myself around and join them in what they are doing.  The art of the rotation allows me to celebrate beautiful time with each one individually.  For those moments {as many as I can get}, it is just the two of us. 

Lost in Wonder

Lost in Wonder

Yes

Yes